Why Jeremiah? Key ideas and contemporary applications

As a Pastor at Wyoming Park Bible Fellowship I have been preaching through Jeremiah. You may ask: Why Jeremiah? Certainly, the book has its challenges for modern readers. It is one of the longest books of the Bible and is dominated by poetry and scenes of judgment. Yet, “all Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness” (1 Tim 3:16). Jeremiah has a unique word for modern Christians. Here are some of the key ideas, and their contemporary applications, that we can learn from Jeremiah.

Idols are worthless. Jeremiah’s most consistent charge against the people of Judah and Jerusalem is that they have exchanged the glory of the Creator God for images that they made with their own hands. These idols are worthless: they cannot save from judgment and they themselves will be judged.

Contemporary application: Idolatry is still a problem, though now in a different form. Whenever we put our ultimate trust or allegiance in another thing or person, instead of in God, we are practicing a form of false worship.

False worship and oppression are linked. Next to the sin of idolatry, Jeremiah places the sins of oppression and violence, especially against the poor and vulnerable. The two are linked. First, idolatry led to pagan cultic practices like child sacrifice. Second, when Judah abandoned God, they also abandoned his just laws and replaced them with laws that favored the strong over the weak. The Kings of Judah bore the brunt of the guilt, using their power for personal gain.

Contemporary application: We sometimes want to separate personal private sin (false worship) with public social sin (violence and oppression) but Jeremiah would have us see the connection. God’s people should be concerned both about right worship and right action. They should put aside idols and pursue justice for the oppressed.

God hates sin and brings judgment against it. Jeremiah’s language of judgment is strong and unrelenting. He is trying to wake up the people of Judah from their false sense of security that the prophets and priests have been feeding them for years. They’ve lost a sense of shame over their sin and they have no fear of the Lord. Jeremiah weeps over them, because he knows that the callousness of their hearts will lead to their destruction and exile.

Contemporary application: We’re always in danger of winking at sin, especially our own. We’ve lost our sense of shame and speak only of God’s judgment in hushed whispers. This isn’t to say we should rail against “the world.” Jeremiah does declare judgment against the nations, but his first and most sustained declarations of judgment are against the people of God.

Religion is worthless. Despite their idolatry and violence Jerusalem maintained a form of the worship of the Lord. They continued to enter into the temple and perform sacrifices. They continued to pray to the Lord and ask him to save them. These religious activities were shown to be false by their obvious hypocrisy. They fled to religion for safety, but not to God. If they had fled to God, they would have also returned to his ways: true worship and justice.

Contemporary application: Religious ritual (church attendance, baptism, prayers, etc.) are good if they bring us close to God and his ways. When we disconnect them from the God who gives them, however, they become worthless. Worse, they give us a false sense of security. The religious person needs to ask: Am I trust in my religion or in the God of my religion?  

God will restore his people. Jeremiah follows the pattern of the prophets: God’s people have turned away from him. They are guilty. God will bring judgment. And: God will restore. His restoration comes out of his own character, his faithfulness to the covenant he made, his mercy and compassion. He will discipline Jerusalem and Judah, but not forever, and when he sets things right, he will establish a “new covenant” that will transform the very hearts of his people.

Contemporary application: Jeremiah unmistakably points us to the gospel. God ultimately restore his people through the person and work of Jesus. In him he establishes a new covenant and, through the Spirit, transforms the hearts of those who trust him. He restores us purely by his character: his grace, mercy, and faithfulness. And, because we are restored to God now in Jesus through faith, we can look forward with confidence to an eternal restoration when Jesus returns.

You can find the sermons on Jeremiah on our church’s podcast, along with sermons on Mark and great sermons by Pastor John in 1 Corinthians and other books: https://anchor.fm/wpbiblefellowship