Tag Archives: Mark of the Beast

Is Bill Gates behind a plot to usher in the new world order of the Antichrist?

In the past week two people recommended to me a video by Pastor J.D. Farag, a self-appointed biblical prophet. In the video he makes the claim that Bill Gates and Anthony Fauci are the “global players” who created the coronavirus pandemic in order to reduce the global population and provide vaccines which simultaneously give people the Mark of the Beast described in the book of Revelation.

While Pastor Farag said some things with which I agree, I believe that his mixture of biblical truth, tenuous speculation, and misrepresentation of facts is a danger to a clear gospel witness.

Farag’s basic argument

The video is split into two sections. In the first 26 minutes Pastor Farag shares his theory for how Bill Gates, Anthony Fauci, and Dr. Deborah Birx fit into biblical prophecies concerning a global government, economy, and religion.

His argument, which focuses on Bill Gates, is based on several important points. First, Bill Gates is a nefarious actor who wants to reduce the global population through abortion and vaccines. Second, he and Dr. Fauci “predicted” that a pandemic would come, which implies that they planned it (a “plandemic”), and are thus behind it. Third, that Bill Gates plans to use this pandemic as a reason to use vaccines to implant miniature microchips into the global population which will be required for people to do business. Fourth, these chips constitute the “mark of the best” described in Revelation.

Checking his claims

My first observation from this video is that many of the points he makes involve a lot of inference and speculation. As I researched his claims, however, I learned that some of his claims are simply false or are gross misrepresentation of the facts.

I will not address every claim, but here are a few examples by way of illustration:

Is there a 666 patent for tracking people using implanted microchips?

Pastor Farag points to the patent W02020060606A1 (notice the 666) as evidence for a global tracking system. He claims (or strongly implies) that it involves implanting a microchip into the skin in the form of a micro-tattoo. The patent number does exist, and it does involve tracking bodily activity and cryptocurrency, but it is about wearable technology (like a smart watch). It makes no mention of a tattoo or implanted microchip (source).

Pastor Farag links this patent to Bill Gates and project called ID2020 to prove his point. Again, he misrepresents the facts. You can read more about it here: source.

Do Bill Gates and Anthony Fauci’s foresight of a pandemic show they planned it?

Pastor Farag also makes a big point about Dr. Fauci and Bill Gates warning of global pandemics or leading efforts to simulate pandemic responses. He muses, “I wonder how they knew?” They knew because we have plenty of historical precedent to know that pandemics of this nature are a danger to humans. It is pure speculation to imply conspiracy when simple wisdom and foresight are a much plausible explanations.

Does Bill Gates want to reduce the world population through vaccines and abortion?

To prove that Bill Gates is nefarious Farag points to a TED talk where Gates said “First, we’ve got population. The world today has 6.8 billion people. That’s headed up to about nine billion. Now, if we do a really great job on new vaccines, health care, reproductive health services, we could lower that by, perhaps, 10 or 15 percent …”

This is a real quote, and on its surface may appear damning, especially if you believe that (1) reproductive health services equals abortion, (2) vaccines are also intended to reduce the population, and (3) Gates is talking about the population, not the population growth. Farag clearly believes (1) and implies (2) and (3).

Point 1: Abortion is tragic, and Bill Gates probably (I could not verify) imagines this as part of reproductive health. That’s terrible. But, in what I was able to discover, His biggest emphasis is on contraceptives and other forms of family planning. I do not mean to minimize the tragedy of abortion, but it does not appear to be Gates’ emphasis.

Point 2: Gates has the counterintuitive view that in places where there is high infant mortality, women have more babies because they know some of those babies will die. Ironically, then, high infant mortality leads to greater population growth. If infant mortality is decreased, through vaccines, then population growth will decrease. While the effectiveness of this plan is debated, he clearly believes that vaccines will save lives and are not harmful.

Point 3: It is clear from the context of the quote that Gates is talking about reducing population growth, not the overall population. He does believe the world is better served through reduced population growth. I do not share his view, but it is very different from saying that the population should be reduced. (source)

A mixture of biblical exposition and speculation

As Farag transitions from his “prophetic” speculation into more mainstream biblical commentary (again, most of which was very good) he takes up the mantle of Jeremiah. He is Jeremiah, the doom and gloom prophet, who is telling people what they can’t handle. His opponents, then, are those who love their lives too much and therefore reject the truth. In doing this, he sets up anyone who disagrees with his speculation (like me) as a “false teacher” who is saying “peace, peace where there is no peace.” As such, he is dangerously mixing biblical truth with his own personal speculations, and misrepresenting those who disagree with him.

A danger to a clear gospel witness

In the last ten minutes he gives a clear explanation of the gospel. For that, with Paul, I am glad that at least the gospel is going out. But before presenting the gospel he has put up a massive and unnecessary stumbling block. Skeptics will listen to the first 26 minutes, research, and see through much of what he is saying. If they see that the first half of his argument is discredited, what will they think of the second half?

With so much uncertainty about what is going on, and with such a desire to see Jesus return, as he has promised to do, it is not surprising to see theories like this. In fact, the history of the church is filled with such speculations and predictions whenever there is a crisis of any sort. However, I think it is better, instead, to stick with what we know. We do not need a detailed picture of the end to know that it is coming. We can still call people to faith and repentance, without this extra “prophecy.” And, I believe in doing so, we become more faithful witness to Jesus.